Marketing that Moves

Why Hire Me?


Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.
— William Penn

Your time = money

Can you write? Probably. Should you? It depends. 

Let's say you're the CEO or CMO of a growing software company. Your time is precious. Assuming you sleep 6+ hours a night (might be an overestimate), you might have 12-15 hours per day to apply to work. 

But for the sake of argument, consider this generic formula:

(Your annual salary) / (number of hours you work per year) = A rough calculation of your hourly rate

Now, estimate how many hours you think you'd spend writing a blog post, creating an eBook, or crafting a guest post for a website like Inc, Forbes, or TechCrunch. Multiply that number by the hourly rate figure you generated above, and you'll have an idea of how much "money" you (or your company) are spending to create that content. 

For instance:

  • $160,000/2,400 = $66.67/hour
  • $66.67/hour x 4 hours per blog post (first draft, edits, second draft, edits) = $266.68

For a more intense project like an eBook, white paper, or guide, you must factor in your time and your team's time. To illustrate the point, let's assume you have a digital marketing manager producing an eBook, a software engineer pitching in with thought leadership and research for that eBook, a CMO overseeing the project, and the CEO pitching in to review drafts:

  • John the digital marketing manager @ ($75,000/2,400) x 60 hours =  $1,875
  • Rick the research associate @ ($90,000/2,400) x 24 hours = $900
  • Sharon the software engineer @ ($130,000/2,400) x 18 hours = $975
  • Stephanie the CMO @ ($220,000/2,400) x 10 hours = $910

Total cost relative to time: ~$4,600. A hefty price to pay considering the possibility that neither John, Sharon, or Stephanie are writers by trade. Frankly, that $3,400 may get you the 25-page document you're looking for... but will it be any good? And even if it is, you'll still need to pay a copyeditor and a designer (either in time or money) to get it into final form. Collectively, the cost could exceed $10,000 — and you may still not end up producing something that truly moves the needle. 

Return on Investment

Of course, outside of those hard costs, there's the opportunity cost, as well. In other words, what could you have accomplished with that time that would have been more valuable for the business? Could you have helped close a deal? 

Measuring content ROI can be exceedingly difficult, largely because there aren't any hard-and-fast metrics or tools that allow you to explicitly associate the actual revenue impact of the content you create. 

But for the sake of argument, consider this generic formula:

(Your annual salary) / (number of hours you work per year)

In loose terms, this will give you a very rough, baseline hourly rate for your time. Now, estimate how many hours you think you'd spend